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Ed was was a constant supporter of Lesley's work with Voice Box and a friend of all its members. He always appeared in the front rows of our concerts and came with us on several of our tours.

Below is a selection of photos of Ed sharing moments with Voice Box.

Click on photos to enlarge

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Keith's French Trip 002
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Ed Morris

All the members of Voice Box were deeply shocked and saddened to learn of the death of Lesley's husband, Ed, in the evening of July 3, 2015.

Our concert scheduled for July 4 at St Kenelm's Church, Minster Lovell, did not take place.

A number of choir members met at the church to share a time of reflection, during which Jennifer Barraclough read the following text:

The truest end of life, is to know the life that never ends. He that makes this his care, will find it his crown at last. And he that lives to live ever, never fears dying; nor can the means be terrible to him that heartily believes the end.

For though death be a dark passage, it leads to immortality, and that’s recompense enough for suffering of it. And yet faith lights us, even through the grave, being the evidence of things not seen.

And this is the comfort of the good, that the grave cannot hold them, and that they live as soon as they die. For death is no more than a turning of us over from time to eternity. Death, then, being the way and condition of life, we cannot love to live, if we cannot bear to die.

They that love beyond the world cannot be separated by it. Death cannot kill what never dies. Nor can spirits ever be divided that love and live in the same Divine Principle, the root and record of their friendship. If absence be not death, neither is theirs.

Death is but crossing the world, as friends do the seas; they live in one another still. For they must needs be present, that love and live in that which is omnipresent. In this divine glass, they see face to face; and their converse is free, as well as pure.

This is the comfort of friends, that though they may be said to die, yet their friendship and society are, in the best sense, ever present, because immortal.

William Penn, 1693
From Quaker Faith and Practice §22.95

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